The best text in the world is of little value if students don’t read it. Starting with the first edition, our goal has been to create a book that students would willingly read, easily learn from, and even like. We’ve been thrilled with the glowing feedback we’ve received from instructors and students using the first four editions of Stats: Modeling the World. Our conversational style, our interesting anecdotes and examples, and even our humor engage students’ interest as they learn statistical thinking. We hear from grateful instructors that their students actually do read this book (sometimes even voluntarily reading ahead of the assignments). And we hear from (often amazed) students that they actually enjoyed their textbook. Here are some of the ways we have made Stats: Modeling the World, Fifth Edition, engaging:

Readability- You’ll see immediately that this book doesn’t read like other Statistics texts. The style is both colloquial and informative, enticing students to actually read the book to see what it says.

Informality- Our informal style doesn’t mean that the subject matter is covered superficially. Not only have we tried to be precise, but wherever possible we offer deeper explanations and justifications than those found in most introductory texts.

Focused lessons- The chapters are shorter than in most other texts, making it easier for both instructors and students to focus on one topic at a time.

Consistency- We’ve worked hard to demonstrate how to do Statistics well. From the very start and throughout the book we model the importance of plotting data, of checking assumptions and conditions, and of writing conclusions that are clear, concise, and in context.


The need to read- Because the important concepts, definitions, and sample solutions aren’t set in boxes, students won’t find it easy to just to skim this book. We intend that it be read, so we’ve tried to make the experience enjoyable.