Features and Benefits

A balanced presentation of the multitude of issues courts face today

  • Presents all sides of the most controversial issues facing courts today letting the reader think critically to draw his or her own conclusions.

  • Features three of the most popular criminal justice authors, joined together for a collaboration of excellence.

  • UPDATED: What Will You Do? boxes feature scenario-based activities that focus on issues such as Web-based conferencing in virtual courtrooms; the notion of precedent as it applies to police decision-making, and victims’ advocacy.

The most comprehensive introduction to America's courts on the market

  • Presupposes no knowledge about the courts or how they operate—begins with the basic structure of the court system and court process and then delves more deeply into the constant struggle for control over the courts that takes place, the many types of courts and the cases that they adjudicate, and the myriad persons and interests that compete for the courts' attention on a daily basis.

  • Goes beyond covering the basics about courts and the personnel who bring them to life, to include the context in which they operate and the complexities of human interaction found at every level.

  • Lasting Impact boxes discuss the significance of certain court cases. The boxes go into depth on the continuing impact of important court decisions such as Mapp v. Ohio; Gideon v. Wainright; Terry v. Ohio; Gregg v. Georgia; In re Gault; Payne v. Tennessee; and Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals.

  • Dedicates an entire chapter to so-called specialized courts—including homeless courts.

The modern approach covers up-to-date topics and recent trends in the field

  • Addresses a wide range of cutting-edge topics and novel practices that stir controversy and enliven discussion as they relate to the courts.

  • UPDATED: Courts in the News features include recent news coverage of real-world court-related developments and thought-provoking questions that build on each story.

  • UPDATED: Integrates the latest statistics and research findings throughout to keep students current and up-to-date. Chapter-by-chapter changes include:

    • Chapter 1: A new chapter-opening story features the surge in court cases involving police shootings and excessive force, particularly in the wake of the 2014 Michael Brown incident in Ferguson, MO. A new Courts in the News box features the Texas lawsuit against the federal government that attempted to block the resettlement in the Lone Star State of 6 Syrian refugees following the Paris terror attacks. The Jodi Arias Courts in the News box was updated with the latest sentencing developments. Two new What Will You Do? exercises appear at the end of the chapter.

    • Chapter 2: A new chapter-opening story features the New York case of the so-called “cannibal cop.” The case highlights the role of appellate review in the criminal process. A new What Will You Do? at the end of the chapter features the lawsuit Oklahoma and Nebraska filed against Colorado, claiming that Colorado’s marijuana legalization scheme is unconstitutional (i.e., is preempted by federal law) and causes undue harm on its neighboring states.

    • Chapter 3: Learning objectives were revised and the chapter was reformatted. The latest federal court caseload data are included. A Courts in the News box features the latest developments in federal drug sentencing, including the release of some 6,000 inmates in late 2015. A new What Will You Do? examines the Supreme Court’s choice not to decide on the constitutionality of a Chicago suburb’s assault weapons ban.

    • Chapter 4: The chapter has been updated with the latest data on state court workloads. The trends section near the end of the chapter was updated with the latest developments in state courts. A new What Will You Do? at the end of the chapter explores use of the National Center for State Courts’ “CourTools” performance measures.

    • Chapter 5: A chapter-opening story discusses the role of implicit bias in juvenile justice decision-making. The latest juvenile court statistics (caseloads, case characteristics) are included, as are recent developments in juvenile justice. Courts in the News boxes from the previous edition were updated. Learning objectives were revised and realigned with new chapter headings. A new What Will You Do? features the cases of eight of the youngest murderers in history. Questions revolve around whether waiver was or should have been used.

    • Chapter 6: Learning objectives were revised. A new Courts in the News box features the Newark (NJ) Youth Court. An updated exhibit features the King County (Washington) Regional Mental Health Court. A new What Will You Do? at the end of the chapter discusses constitutional issues relating to forced Alcoholics Anonymous participation in a drug court context.

    • Chapter 7: A new chapter-opening photo and chapter-opening story are included. The table showing judicial salaries has been updated. Data and statistics have been updated throughout.

    • Chapter 8: A new photo opens the chapter. Data and statistics have been updated throughout. A new What Will You Do? rounds out the chapter.

    • Chapter 9: Felony offense statistics have been updated.

    • Chapter 10: A new chapter-opening story and associated photograph open the chapter. Statistics and data have been updated throughout the chapter. An added What Will You Do? rounds out the chapter.

    • Chapter 11: A new chapter-opening story on a Bitcoin exchange scam. A Courts in the News tracks the arrest of a rapist. Post arrest detention is covered in depth. A Courts in the News feature covers the interrogation of the Boston Marathon Bomber.

    • Chapter 12: A new chapter-opening story highlights the case of Alexander Fishenko, who pled guilty to acting as an agent of the Russian government within the United States. A new Courts in the News covers Stephen Parks and his Coal Tax Scheme to sell nonexistent refined coal tax credits through a broker to investors. Another new Courts in the News covers Linda Weston and the Basement of Horrors Case.

    • Chapter 13: A new Courts in the News covers the trial of Don Blankenship, former Chief Executive Officer of Massey Energy who guilty on a federal charge of conspiracy to willfully violate mine health and safety standards. There is a new section on Jury Nullification Today.

    • Chapter 14: A new opening vignette on Thomas Sanders, 57, who was sentenced to death for the murder of Lexis Roberts. A new Courts in the News reviews Life Sentences for Juveniles. A new section on Race and Sentencing looks at this controversial issue; More than 60% of the people in prison are now racial and ethnic minorities, does this mean that sentencing is biased?

    • Chapter 15: A new chapter-opening story of East Haven, Ct. Police Officer Dennis Spaulding, who was sentenced to 5 years of imprisonment for violating the civil rights of members of the East Haven community. The case of Hill v. US and Dorsey v. US is now included. A Courts in the News looks at the controversial topic of Wrongful Convictions while another Courts in the News entitled "Reduce Wrongful Convictions? Modernize the Trial," reviews an interesting solution to this pressing problem.

    • Chapter 16: A new chapter-opening story begins the chapter. New information on human trafficking has been added. An added What Will You Do? rounds out the chapter.

Outstanding pedagogical features give students the tools to master key concepts faster and more effectively

  • UPDATED: Chapter-opening stories highlight the chapter’s theme and how it relates to current events.

  • Learning objectives at the start of each chapter allow students to focus their study on key concepts.

  • Additional in-text study aids facilitate learning, such as:

    • Marginal key terms and an accompanying glossary

    • Bulleted chapter summaries which refresh students’ memory about the chapter’s key points

    • Review questions which link back to learning objectives

    • Web extras which lead readers to websites, blogs, and in-depth postings of importance to the study of courts

    • Library extras which provide links to important court-related documents on the Internet

  • Comprehensive instructor support includes PowerPoint presentations covering the entire text, a complete test bank, and an Instructor's Manual.

Courts and Criminal Justice in America, Third Edition, is also available via Revel™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.

Overview

Courts and Criminal Justice in America, Third Edition, is also available via Revel™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.


A balanced presentation of the multitude of issues courts face today

  • UPDATED: What Will You Do? boxes feature scenario-based activities that focus on issues such as Web-based conferencing in virtual courtrooms; the notion of precedent as it applies to police decision-making, and victims’ advocacy.

The modern approach covers up-to-date topics and recent trends in the field

  • UPDATED: Courts in the News features include recent news coverage of real-world court-related developments and thought-provoking questions that build on each story.

  • UPDATED: Integrates the latest statistics and research findings throughout to keep students current and up-to-date. Chapter-by-chapter changes include:

    • Chapter 1: A new chapter-opening story features the surge in court cases involving police shootings and excessive force, particularly in the wake of the 2014 Michael Brown incident in Ferguson, MO. A new Courts in the News box features the Texas lawsuit against the federal government that attempted to block the resettlement in the Lone Star State of 6 Syrian refugees following the Paris terror attacks. The Jodi Arias Courts in the News box was updated with the latest sentencing developments. Two new What Will You Do? exercises appear at the end of the chapter.

    • Chapter 2: A new chapter-opening story features the New York case of the so-called “cannibal cop.” The case highlights the role of appellate review in the criminal process. A new What Will You Do? at the end of the chapter features the lawsuit Oklahoma and Nebraska filed against Colorado, claiming that Colorado’s marijuana legalization scheme is unconstitutional (i.e., is preempted by federal law) and causes undue harm on its neighboring states.

    • Chapter 3: Learning objectives were revised and the chapter was reformatted. The latest federal court caseload data are included. A Courts in the News box features the latest developments in federal drug sentencing, including the release of some 6,000 inmates in late 2015. A new What Will You Do? examines the Supreme Court’s choice not to decide on the constitutionality of a Chicago suburb’s assault weapons ban.

    • Chapter 4: The chapter has been updated with the latest data on state court workloads. The trends section near the end of the chapter was updated with the latest developments in state courts. A new What Will You Do? at the end of the chapter explores use of the National Center for State Courts’ “CourTools” performance measures.

    • Chapter 5: A chapter-opening story discusses the role of implicit bias in juvenile justice decision-making. The latest juvenile court statistics (caseloads, case characteristics) are included, as are recent developments in juvenile justice. Courts in the News boxes from the previous edition were updated. Learning objectives were revised and realigned with new chapter headings. A new What Will You Do? features the cases of eight of the youngest murderers in history. Questions revolve around whether waiver was or should have been used.

    • Chapter 6: Learning objectives were revised. A new Courts in the News box features the Newark (NJ) Youth Court. An updated exhibit features the King County (Washington) Regional Mental Health Court. A new What Will You Do? at the end of the chapter discusses constitutional issues relating to forced Alcoholics Anonymous participation in a drug court context.

    • Chapter 7: A new chapter-opening photo and chapter-opening story are included. The table showing judicial salaries has been updated. Data and statistics have been updated throughout.

    • Chapter 8: A new photo opens the chapter. Data and statistics have been updated throughout. A new What Will You Do? rounds out the chapter.

    • Chapter 9: Felony offense statistics have been updated.

    • Chapter 10: A new chapter-opening story and associated photograph open the chapter. Statistics and data have been updated throughout the chapter. An added What Will You Do? rounds out the chapter.

    • Chapter 11: A new chapter-opening story on a Bitcoin exchange scam. A Courts in the News tracks the arrest of a rapist. Post arrest detention is covered in depth. A Courts in the News feature covers the interrogation of the Boston Marathon Bomber.

    • Chapter 12: A new chapter-opening story highlights the case of Alexander Fishenko, who pled guilty to acting as an agent of the Russian government within the United States. A new Courts in the News covers Stephen Parks and his Coal Tax Scheme to sell nonexistent refined coal tax credits through a broker to investors. Another new Courts in the News covers Linda Weston and the Basement of Horrors Case.

    • Chapter 13: A new Courts in the News covers the trial of Don Blankenship, former Chief Executive Officer of Massey Energy who guilty on a federal charge of conspiracy to willfully violate mine health and safety standards. There is a new section on Jury Nullification Today.

    • Chapter 14: A new opening vignette on Thomas Sanders, 57, who was sentenced to death for the murder of Lexis Roberts. A new Courts in the News reviews Life Sentences for Juveniles. A new section on Race and Sentencing looks at this controversial issue; More than 60% of the people in prison are now racial and ethnic minorities, does this mean that sentencing is biased?

    • Chapter 15: A new chapter-opening story of East Haven, Ct. Police Officer Dennis Spaulding, who was sentenced to 5 years of imprisonment for violating the civil rights of members of the East Haven community. The case of Hill v. US and Dorsey v. US is now included. A Courts in the News looks at the controversial topic of Wrongful Convictions while another Courts in the News entitled "Reduce Wrongful Convictions? Modernize the Trial," reviews an interesting solution to this pressing problem.

    • Chapter 16: A new chapter-opening story begins the chapter. New information on human trafficking has been added. An added What Will You Do? rounds out the chapter.

Outstanding pedagogical features give students the tools to master key concepts faster and more effectively

  • UPDATED: Chapter-opening stories highlight the chapter’s theme and how it relates to current events.